Why School Buses Have White Roofs

Why School Buses Have White Roofs


Ever ridden on a school bus? I’ll bet you did! The most prominent thing about them (at least
in the U.S.) is that they’re yellow. But their roofs are usually a different color
– white. So why is that? Let’s find out! There are, in fact, several reasons. The first one is obvious if you remember that
not many school buses are equipped with AC. Now imagine a super-hot day right before summer
break and a bunch of kids in a metal box on wheels. This ride would be anything but comfortable,
right? That’s why keeping the interior temperature
of a bus lower becomes an important issue. Why do we tend to wear light-colored clothes
during the summer? Yup, because these colors absorb less solar
heat, reflecting it instead. And thanks to that, you don’t feel like
bacon in a frying pan. But the same trick works with other things
besides clothes. The white roof of a bus makes the temperature
inside drop an average of 10 degrees during warm seasons and only 3 to 4 degrees in wintertime. And even if a bus has AC, the white top helps
reduce fuel consumption by 20%. That’s great, both from a financial and
ecological point of view. But white-topped buses are also much easier
to spot from afar by the drivers of other vehicles, which makes the trip to school safer. Besides, in the case of an emergency, a bus
will be noticed faster by a rescue helicopter. Finally, not painting the roof the same yellow
color as the rest of a bus is just cheaper, since the material most bus manufacturers
use is already white. And while the iconic yellow school buses are
common around the world (except for the color, which can vary) there are school buses that
are anything but ordinary. Just look… Monster Truck
The owner of this vehicle turned a vintage 1956 school bus into a real giant! The size is impressive: it’s 13 feet high,
22 feet long, has 25-inch-rims, and weighs 19,000 pounds. Would you want to take a ride? Let me know! As you can guess, this truck doesn’t bring
kids to school daily, but they can still get a ride. Its owner modified the bus back in 2002, and
since that time, it’s served different purposes like being a means of transportation for a
youth center, a school district, and a children’s hospital. Pikachu Bus
The US chose the sunny color in 1939, creating national standards because it makes a vehicle
highly visible on the road. However, in Japan, school buses don’t have
a standard color. But they don’t have problems standing out
and letting all the other drivers know that this vehicle has kids onboard. An Osaka kindergarten bus design was inspired
by one of the most famous anime characters ever – Pikachu. Actually, using anime characters for modifying
school buses is pretty common for this country. There, you’ll find Hello Kitty and Totoro
Neko on the buses, plus more! Rickshaw Bus
Imagine a metal box secured to a bike and you’ll get an idea of what a rickshaw is. This mode of transportation is still used
for school children in different parts of India. This vehicle doesn’t provide much space;
that’s why kids’ bags usually travel on the roof. Though the government is concerned about the
safety of these rides and has tried to phase them out in favor of buses, rickshaws are
still used since the drivers don’t want to lose a big part of their income. School Yellow Boat
Getting to school in this village in the Philippines, used to be no easy feat. Kids had to wade more than 1 mile in chest-deep
water, holding their books over their heads to reach a school in Zamboanga City. But everything changed when the Yellow Boat
of Hope Foundation took the matter into their own hands and gifted the village community
with a boat. Now kids arrive at school safely and dry. Later, the foundation raised funds that allowed
communities from other areas in the Philippines to get large motorized boats, plus 120 smaller
vessels for commuting. Topsy-turvy Bus
This one looks as if you’re seeing double and, strictly speaking, it’s not an official
school bus in New York. But since this radically transformed vehicle
runs on vegetable oil, (yum!) it tours the whole country to educate kids about eco-friendly
alternatives and explain to them how important it is to look for renewable energy sources. Bicycle Bus
Almost 50% of the Netherlands’ population rides a bike every day to go to work. So, the government came up with the idea of
a bus for kids ages 4 to 12 that will carry them to school the same way. This bus can fit a driver, 8 students who
must pedal, and 3 other students who can sit on a bench in the back. The bike can go as fast as 10 miles per hour,
and there’s also a motor installed that helps it get uphill, or when kids feel too
tired to pedal. The company that invented them believes it’s
a great way to both keep kids physically active, and teach them the importance of green transportation. Yeah, these buses are impressive but there
are other weird modes of public transport that will make you say “Wow!”. For example,… The suspension monorail. This is the oldest electric elevated railway
with hanging cars. It started operating in 1901. More than 85,000 passengers use it every day
to get around Wuppertal in Germany. This strange railway runs a route of more
than 8 miles at a height of about 39 feet. Moving footpath
If you’re ever in Hong Kong, you’ll appreciate the world’s longest outdoor escalator that
connects the city’s central district with the higher-lying residential neighborhoods. It stretches for over 2,600 feet, and allows
you to hop on and off whenever you want, and explore the city without exhausting walks
uphill. The whole journey will take you 20-25 minutes. The cost of this escalator comes close to
$31.2 million. However, anyone can take a ride since it’s
free. Maglev Train
Shanghai boasts one of the fastest trains in the world. The Maglev – short for “magnetic levitation”
– runs at a speed of 267 miles per hour and covers 21
miles in only 8 minutes, making it a breeze for passengers to travel between the airport
and downtown. Why is it so fast? Levitation magnets on the underside of the
guideway are positioned to attract the opposite poles of magnets at the bottom of the maglev. Thanks to this, the train floats over the
guideway. Toboggan
A toboggan is a wicker basket attached to two wooden runners that glide on greased up
rags. It’s one of Madeira, Portugal’s most famous
attractions, and takes tourists for a 1-mile journey down a curvy road. The two runners, or “Carreiros”, are usually
dressed in white and wear straw hats. They also have special, rubber-soled shoes
that help them steer and brake the toboggan. The trip will take you around 10 minutes. Gotham Air
In a hurry to get to JFK or Newark Airports from Manhattan island? Then take a helicopter ride! The helicopter service, Gotham Air, launched
in 2015 and allows its clients to save tons of time. Since on-the-ground traffic is rather congested
in the city it’ll take you up to 2 hours by car. But if you’re willing to pay from $199 to
$219, you won’t have to worry about missing the plane – the helicopter ride will only
last for about 6 minutes! Just a hop, skip and a jump, and hey, you’ll
also be 200 bucks lighter! So, if you learned something new today, then
give the video a like and share it with a friend! And here are some other cool videos I think
you’ll enjoy. Just click to the left or right, and stay
on the Bright Side of life!

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