Walking holiday on Naxos and Amorgos

Walking holiday on Naxos and Amorgos


My walking holiday begins on the
beautiful island of Naxos, where I start with a magical mystery tour exploring the winding alleyways, shops and restaurants of the main town itself. Naxos is the largest island in the Cyclades, and also one of the greenest,
with a huge variety of landscapes from idyllic coves and rocky plateaus to its more mountainous interior It’s also home to ancient monuments like the temple of Demeter and this stunning medieval Byzantine church near the village of Chalki, one of the oldest on Naxos. Exploring the island’s hidden network of
pathways, I discover an ancient Greek marble quarry with these unfinished
statues, as well as medieval forts and yet more stunning views. In the Northeast, starting from the village of Koronos, I head to the coast, greeted along the
way by hospitable locals like Georgios. After a welcome glass of homemade raki,
he introduces me to his extended family. Heading on I arrived at Lionas Beach
where I enjoy a delicious meal at the delightful family-run Delfinaki
restaurant. Life doesn’t get much better! After bidding a fond farewell to Naxos
and its famous temple to Apollo, I take a boat to nearby Amorgos – another idyllic but much smaller island. Once again my days are filled with
walking expeditions around the coast and inland, exploring the winding lanes of
some wonderfully atmospheric towns and villages. On the rugged east coast I’m
greeted by some of the island’s friendly population of stray cats, before I climb
the steep stone steps to the astonishing cliffside Monastery of Chozoviotiza. My base in Amorgos is the small seaside
town of Aegialis, lapped by some of the clearest, bluest
waters in the Aegean sea. After a day exploring the surrounding hills and being greeted by yet more friendly cats, I return each evening to my beachside
paradise, and not for the first time on this wonderfully relaxing holiday, I’m bewitched by yet another glorious sunset.

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