Most INTERESTING Islands On Earth!

Most INTERESTING Islands On Earth!


Hi, guys! It’s Samantha! From an island full of miniature deer to a
place where residents have to carry gas masks everywhere they go, here are the most interesting
islands on Earth! 13. Tashirojima Also known as “Cat Island,” this little
landmass is located in the Pacific Ocean. The island is inhabited but only by about
one hundred people, which decreased from about one thousand people in the 1950s. You probably guessed this already, but it
got the nickname “Cat Island” by its significant population of stray cats. The felines were originally kept to chase
mice away from the silk-worms used to make textiles in the Edo Period. Since the cats weren’t neutered, they kept
multiplying; there are far more cats on the island nowadays than there are people. They allegedly outnumber their human counterparts
six to one. The locals take care of the furry creatures
because they believe that feeding them will result in good fortune and wealth, and they
even built a shrine dedicated to the felines in the center of the island. Over eighty percent of the human inhabitants
on the island are considered elderly; so, the villages on the island are called “terminal’
because the population is threatened. 12. Santa Cruz Del Islote This man-made island is in the San Bernardo
Archipelago off the coast of Bolivar in Colombia. It is called the Holy Cross Islet or Santa
Cruz Islet in English. It is one of the most densely populated islands
on the planet due to its minuscule size and large number of inhabitants. It is about seven hundred feet long and three
hundred ninety feet wide. About eighteen families live here in just
under one hundred houses. There is only one school on the island and
a single teacher. There is also only one restaurant that doubles
as a port, and a cross in the center of the island is what gives it its name. The island’s inhabitants make their livings
by fishing, cleaning, cooking, and tourism. Where do visitors stay, you ask? In hotels on islands nearby. The majority of the population is made up
of young people, and they all seem very happy and full of life. According to an article in The Guardian, they
don’t have to worry about violence or crimes, and there are seemingly endless parties nearly
every night. However, as opposed to their elders, much
of the younger generation on Santa Cruz del Islote plans to leave the island and move
to the mainland. 11. Miyake-Jima This island is in the Philippine Sea about
one hundred ten miles southeast of Japan. Miyake-Jima is a stratovolcano, meaning it’s
made of several layers of solidified lava that date all the way back to the Pleistocene,
which was about fifteen thousand years ago. The entire coastline of the island is around
twenty-four miles, and its average diameter is approximately five miles. In the span of five hundred years, the volcano,
Mount Oyama, has erupted thirteen times. The most recent eruption was in 2000, and
the islanders were forced to leave until February 2005 after emissions had stopped. However, since this explosion, a continual
flow of sulfur dioxide comes out of Mount Oyama; so, the locals always have to carry
gas masks. But, they only have to wear them if the toxic
gas levels increase, in which case the alarms are sounded. 10. Thilafushi Thilafushi is a man-made island in the Maldives
west of Male, the capital. It started as a lagoon that was about four
miles long and six hundred fifty feet wide. It became an island after people came up with
a solution to the garbage disposal issues of Male city in the 1990s. In 1992, Thilafushi became an official dump
and received its first load of trash, which led to its nickname, “Rubbish Island.” Four about twenty years, almost 330 tons of
garbage was brought to the area every day, and its daily growth was about ten square
feet. Nowadays, Thilafushi is over four and a half
million square feet. In 1997, the government started leasing the
land to entrepreneurs who could use it for industrial reasons, including cement packing,
manufacturing boats, and bottling methane gas. But, despite its usefulness for factories,
the garbage has created tremendous environmental problems. The trash contains things like lead, asbestos,
and other hazardous materials that are leaking into the water. The ecological campaign of the Maldives, called
Bluepeace, described Thilafushi as a “toxic bomb,” and BBC said the island was “apocalyptic”
in 2012. 9. Snake Island This fascinating place is in the Atlantic
Ocean about twenty-one miles off the coast of Brazil. It is about one hundred ten acres in area. As you might have guessed by its name, this
island is full of snakes, specifically the golden lancehead pit viper. These serpents got stuck on the landmass when
sea levels began rising and enveloped the area that attached it to the mainland. Estimates suggest that there is about one
snake to every ten square feet, and a 2015 Discovery Channel documentary said that there
are between two to four thousand golden lanceheads on the island. 8. No Man’s Land Fort This island is also just called No Man’s
Fort and is near Portsmouth, England. Construction on the fort started in 1865 and
ended in 1880. The original purpose of the structure was
to help protect against the threat of French invasion by sea; however, by the time it was
finished being built, the danger had passed. Later on, the structure was used similarly
to a hotel for high-paying visitors. It is very private, being completely isolated. In 2004, it was closed down due to the presence
of bacteria in the water system, which can cause illness. In 2005, they tried to sell the structure
before the company fell apart, and in 2008, Harmesh Pooni, the alleged owner, locked himself
inside to protest the KPMG service company, which ultimately sold the property in 2009. The new owner, Clarenco, converted it into
an official hotel, which opened in 2015. 7. Big Major Cay Also known as Pig Island, this unique place
is located in Exuma, the Bahamas. In case you didn’t get the clue from this
island’s nickname, it happens to be populated by wild pigs. In fact, the pigs are the only ones who live
on this island; no people reside there. Nobody knows exactly why these animals live
on the island because they aren’t native. However, there are theories as to why they’re
there. The most common story is that they were left
on Major Cay by soldiers who had actually planned on going back for some bacon later
on… but, the seamen never returned. So, the little piggies ate food that other
vessels would throw on the island. Another theory is that the animals survived
a shipwreck and swam to shore. Some people even think that the pigs were
put on the island to increase tourism and make money… and if that’s the case, then
their plan worked. 6. No Name Key This island is in the lower part of the Florida
Keys in the United States. It is located about three miles away from
U.S. Highway 1. It was originally known for not being connected
to any commercial electricity source, and residents used solar, gas, and diesel to power
their homes. But, that issue ended in 2013 when they were
finally able to plug into the primary power source in Monroe County. No Name Key only has forty-three houses and
is also home to the Key Deer, and endangered species. This creature is endemic to the Florida Keys
and is a member of the white-tailed deer family. It is the smallest deer in North America,
only reaching forty-four to seventy-five pounds and standing up to thirty inches tall at the
shoulders. 5. Skorpios This private island is located in the Ionian
Sea off the coast of Greece. Skorpios is about four thousand nine hundred
feet long and three thousand three hundred feet across, but, it is abnormally shaped. The island is covered in about two hundred
different types of trees, which were initially imported by Onassis, a late shipping billionaire,
when the land was bare. This landmass is most prominently known as
Onassis’ private island, and he married Jackie Kennedy there in 1968. The couple hosted parties on Skorpios, and
Jackie had a house built there so she could escape the stresses of daily life. She was once photographed completely naked
on this island by the paparazzi. The island passed to daughter, Christina,
after he passed away and then to her daughter, Athina, in 1988. In 2013, Athina sold Skorpios to Ekaterina
Rybolovleva, the daughter of a Russian billionaire. The new owner allegedly plans to make the
island into a retreat, and is currently off limits to tourists. 4. Uros Islands This is a group of seventy islands that were
all artificially constructed out of totora reeds. They’re found on Lake Titicaca in Peru. The people of the Uros tribe inhabit the islands,
and their history goes further back than the Inca civilization. The islands vary in size; the bigger ones
can hold about ten different families, and only two to three families can live on the
smaller ones, which are about a hundred feet wide. The islands are held in place via ropes that
are attached to sticks stuck in the lakebed. The people have had to add reeds to the top
of each island consistently because the bottom ones deteriorate semi-quickly in the water
and even faster in the rainy season. The inhabitants have to work even harder nowadays
to keep up with the maintenance of their islands because so many tourists visit them. However, they profit from tourism as well. Only about three hundred still have homes
on the islands as most of them have moved over to the mainland. 3. Oku-no-shima This island is located in Takehara, Hiroshima
Prefecture in the Inland Sea of Japan. It is also known as “Rabbit Island” because
it has a vast population of… you guessed it… rabbits! These fuzzballs have inhabited the island
since after World War II. They were released on purpose when the landmass
was converted into a park after the conflict ended. Visitors are forbidden from hunting the bunnies,
and people can’t bring their dogs or cats on the island. However, Okunoshima’s history is also a
significant reason people like to visit it. In 1925, the Institute of Science and Technology
of the Imperial Japanese Army started a top secret program to make chemical armament. They built a plant on the island from 1927
to 1929 to carry out these plans. They even erased Okunoshima from maps to hide
the factory’s construction because Japan had signed the Geneva Protocol in 1925, which
banned the use of these weapons. The island’s fish processing area even transformed
into a “toxic gas reactor.” Many people suffered from the effects of the
gases. Today, there is a Poison Gas Museum that was
built in 1988 to spread knowledge about these dangerous gases. 2. Assateague This unique island is in the Atlantic Ocean
off of the east coast of the Delmarva peninsula in the United States. It is a barrier island, which means it’s
a landform made by the waves and tides near the seashore. Assateague has changed, like all barrier islands,
over time, and once was connected to Fenwick Island. But, after the Chesapeake-Potomac hurricane
in 1993, the islands were separated. They are now over half a mile apart. Assateague is now owned by three different
organizations, including the United States Fish and Wildlife Service, NPS, and Maryland
State Parks. A large part of the island is the Assateague
Island National Seashore, which was established to provide a habitat for snow geese and other
migratory birds. People aren’t allowed to bring their pets
on this island, but there are camping areas available. Plus, people normally go kayaking to take
in the wildlife. There are over three hundred twenty types
of birds that live on Assateague, including the great blue heron, snowy egret, and American
oystercatcher. This landmass is also very well-known for
its population of wild horses. The animals were originally domesticated;
a legend states that the present horses’ ancestors were survivors of a shipwreck. 1. The Island Of The Dolls This haunting place is in the middle of Mexico
City between the Xochimilco canals. The small island was initially owned by Don
Julian Santana. It got its name in the 1950s when he started
hanging dolls in the trees to protect himself from evil spirits. A legend states that a young lady got trapped
by the lilies in the canal and drowned. After the girl passed away, Santana started
experiencing strange events, which scared him. He thought that the worn dolls would frighten
the soul of the woman who drowned. He also hung a doll that he believed she had
owned. Then, Don Julian began hearing footsteps,
wailing, and whispers in the dark. So, he continued hanging up the dolls for
fifty years to satisfy the woman’s spirit. Over time, the island has become a huge tourist
attraction and has been featured various times on television channels like ABC News, Travel
Channel, and The Huffington Post. The allure of the supernatural place makes
it number one on our list of interesting islands. Today’s featured comment is from Elizabeth
on our “Why You Don’t Hear About Caitlyn Jenner Anymore” video! Thanks for your thoughts, Elizabeth! Remember to comment below and we might feature
you in a future video!

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